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Safe Rodent Control | December 16, 2017

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This is an online community for anyone who has a story about the effects of rodenticide use or who would like to share tips on keeping rats and mice away. We welcome you to participate in the online discussions, exchange stories or just explore topics shared on this page.

 

Featured Story

Kamari’s Tale: Please don’t use mouse poison

The Story of a Kitten by Jennifer Esposito

My name is Kamari.  I was a rescue kitten.  My human family loved me very much.  They called me Mar-Mars for short.

I loved to play and cuddle. I was so happy to have a furrever home with my humans and my furry brothers and sisters.  My human family hoped I’d be a companion to them and my human baby brother for years to come.

 

I found so many interesting things to play with and see all around my house.

I found so many interesting things to play with and see all around my house.

Kamari_5-5

I was an important pat of my human family, and sometimes I thought I was human too.


Karami_6-6Last Sunday, I saw a mouse, so I caught it.  I thought that’s what I was supposed to do.  I thought I was being a good kitty.  It was just three days until I’d be ten months old.  I thought my family would be pleased I’d caught the mouse.  But someone who lived nearby had used mouse poison instead of traps or electronic pest deterrents.  The mouse was poisoned and I ate it.  I died too.  My family is very sad.

The people who used the mouse poison probably didn’t know it could kill other animals who might get hold of the mouse.  My family didn’t know either.  But mouse poison can kill cats, dogs, and birds of prey if a poisoned mouse gets outside and another animal catches it or plays with it.  My family doesn’t want this to happen to any other family.  They miss me very, very much, and they worry about my furry brothers and sisters and other families’ cats and dogs also.  So please, for me and for my family, don’t use mouse or rat poison.  The life you save could be YOUR furry baby’s or the furry baby of someone you love.  Please let others know also to use mouse traps instead of poison.  If we all spread the word, other families won’t be sad like my family is.  Other lives will be saved.

My name is Kamari.  I had a wonderful life for ten months.  It didn’t have to end this way.

 

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Comments

  1. Linda Richards

    Hello, came across your organization for an article I’m writing. Thank you for all you do. Wanted to share that we have had success in removing rodents from our attic through IPM techniques. We hired a company to seal all entrances under our tile roof, not an easy job. It took awhile but our attic is finally rodent-free. We also removed old squirrel nests that rodents had taken over and only feed the wild birds in the morning so it’s gone at night. Also, we have had success in live-trapping them – it was a week after putting out the live trap next to our house by our outdoor parrot cages (we put them out during the day, and documented a large rat climbing all over the cage at night). We hadn’t even put bait in it and the large rat entered it anyway. An example of how they can get used to a trap that is foreign to them at first. We relocated it to a remote area. If you want to read more about our experience and what I’ve written about rodenticides see http://www.ifnaturecouldtalk.com

  2. Earl Finnegan

    There are much safer ways to have mice removal in Naperville done. I’m sorry for your loss.

  3. Jonathan Evans

    The much-beloved family dog of a leading Northern California researcher studying how the effects of rodenticides harmed endangered species was maliciously poisoned using the same controversial poison he was studying, brodifacoum.

    The dog named Nyxo died on February 3rd, 2014. He belonged to a conservation scientist, who has been investigating how the highly toxic rat poison brodifacoum threatens wildlife, including Pacific fishers and northern spotted owls. A necropsy revealed that the dog had ingested red meat laced with brodifacoum.

    As described by the owner: “Nyxo was a wonderful, handsome family dog. We met him as an abused local foster dog with and we took him under our wing to build his trust once again in humans. We fell in love with him, decided to adopt him and he was an excellent foster brother to many other foster dogs. The neighborhood kids loved him dearly and often asked to take him for walks.”

    Nyxo was discovered having seizures and had vomited red meat, which the family had not fed to the dog. The dog was immediately taken to a local veterinarian, who was unable to save the animal’s life. The owner drove Nyxo’s body to a laboratory at the University of California at Davis, where a necropsy determined that Nyxo had died of brodifacoum poisoning.

    The evidence strongly suggests that this malicious poisoning is tied to that research. The use of violence to silence the conservation work of any scientist, researcher or citizen is deplorable. This tragedy is yet another example of how the reckless use and sale of these poisonsis ruining lives by indiscriminately killing pets and wildlife.

    The Center for Biological Diversity has announced a reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those involved in the poisoning. For more information visit: http://www.JusticeForNyxo.org.

  4. Bonnie Lewenza

    Why is there no petition going to help out with this fight on the pesticides? Care2 would love to give this a run.

  5. Would you consider starting a list of all the municipalities and large organizations using non-rodenticides? This can be helpful to those of us who are working as activists and need lists to show decision makers that THEY can do it too! I have started a table marking municiplaities (counties, cities, school districts, colleges) that have stopped using rodenticides in each structures, landscapes, open space, and/or ALL managed areas. I have listed about 8 from those who I have direct contact with and 8 more from the internet news postings. Do you have something that I can cross reference with.. if not, I can also provide you with what I have.

    We’re going to be launching a new website this summer…

  6. Nathalie du Mortier

    My home has become infested with rodents…under house, over the house in the walls and attic! Have gotten 3 estimates to trap get rid of rodents, clean remove and sanitize contaminated areas crawl spaces and properly and safely…to close any open spaces under, over and all around house…all estimates a little over 4000$! Fearing possibility they’ve gotten in air ducts circulating airborne virus and mites etc…spreading hantavirus to my child and I! I have attempted to put out traps in areas that I can…however no luck nor does that take care of all the disease causing urine saliva fecal matter in attic crawl spaces and walls and who knows how many generations or types of pests as to worker took pictures of attic staying he saw 1 big rat run away as he stuck his head in attic and based on small and very large droppings old and fresh it’s obvious that they’ve made they home in our walls for some time! My daughter and I hear them fighting wresting in walls moving wood and banging into the pipes and now the pipes make noise when washing machine runs or showering…fear it is a fire hazard affecting structure of house etc but most importantly our health and health of others! Being proactive however thus far no one has given me resources or offered assistance with this problem with I thought was a public health concern? Have only gotten guidelines of how to rid of the problem myself! However I don’t see how that is possible for me to get under house, in attic and crawl spaces to remove replace sanitize using all nessacary guidelines to avoid spreading contamination and aerosols… and precautions for my own safety protection and enclose all areas the size of a dime to rid myself of this problem! Figure there must be sum sort of assistance for someone like me in this situation as to can affect the whole neighborhood if isn’t addressed not to mention get a lot of people sick! I’m hoping to find a solution in dire need to get this resolved before more damage is done! Can’t understand Dept of health and safety would not see this as a problem redirecting me to vector control who can’t do anything but send me proper guidelines to follow to get rid of pest nusanse myself…as to budget cuts don’t allow them to give poison out free anymore can send an inspector for 75$ who will not go under house, look in attic or check roof…but only advise me of what needs to be done follow guidelines or refer me to a pest removal company! Please help me with this as to im at a loss of what to do from here…

  7. Carol

    Hi–I have had a intermittent problem with rats in my barn (live in Western NY). Two years ago, after trying to control the growing rat population with snap traps for many months, I had to resort to using rodent poison in pellet form (came in small bag which I poured into a dish in an empty horse stall that I locked). I did eradicate all rats that year (and there were many), but they return from time to time. I have been using snap traps again because I don’t want to use poison.

    I also have Siberian Huskies that I co-own and show, and one of them ate a dead, poisoned rat the year I used poison. I put the dog on Vitamin K and she never had any symptoms. However, my friend who I co-own one of the dogs with has deemed my place unsafe even if I never use poison again. Her vet has told her rats carry and store their food and that someday poison might fall out from a wall or be uncovered in the dirt.

    In addition to never using poison again, I am thinking about having all dirt floors in the barn redone. What is your knowledge on rats storing food and how long might pellets last somewhere? Do you have any other advice as to what I could do and how I can make my barn “safe” again? Also, in addition to snap traps is there additional natural methods of deterring rats?

    Thank you.

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